I asked my friend, Graeme, a Christian health worker who is on the “front lines” against the Coronavirus:

“What should humanity do when God sends us pestilence?”

Speaking as a health worker, Graeme, who belongs to the Uniting Church In Australia, answered:

“First I would ask: Why has God sent us a pestilence?

Eventually I would conclude: Either there is something wrong with my view of God or there is something wrong with the world.

If the latter, then I would ask: What gifts has God granted me to help fight this unwanted intrusion?

e.g. Can I use my God-given brain, knowledge and medical technology etc to understand and counter the pestilence?

Even if I lose the battle I have still won: I took deliberate action to demonstrate that the pestilence is a bad thing not a normal thing.”

Speaking as a Christian, Graeme’s response was similar but different.

“First I would ask: Why has God sent us a pestilence and spared me and not others? Am I any better? Were those who died punished for being bad?

Eventually I would conclude: Either there is something wrong with my view of God or there is something wrong with the world.

If the former I would then ask: What do some other cultural worldviews say about the pestilence?

I guess Buddha would say the pestilence is neither good nor bad; and I must give up my selfish desires for health, happiness, and long life. He would discourage my desire for answers or meaning or health. To which I would want to ask ‘Does your answer indicate you have desires too? In this case a desire to help me? Are you being inconsistent? Does this mean doctors and nurses should stop desiring to help people?’

I guess the Hindu would say it is karma and those who suffer are simply experiencing what was their due for some evil done in a past life. Yes, you can choose to help others or not to help others, it doesn’t really matter. There is no need for someone in a higher caste to worry about those suffering in a lower caste level.

When I ask the Christian God ‘why?’ the answer is the shortest verse in the bible. An eye witness observation of John, when Jesus came to the grave of his best friend: ‘Jesus wept.’  (John Chapter 11:35) Why did John bother writing this when a few minutes later he claims that Jesus brought Lazarus back to life? Why not say that Jesus scorned or laughed or sniggered? In these two words we get a sneak peek into the character of God – a God who weeps at the sight of death.

– Graeme, Melbourne, Australia.”

 

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.

What is meant by The Word in this sentence?

Maybe a Universal Mind.

Maybe Truth.

In modern terms maybe Communication.

Jesus, a man known to very many people as Lord Jesus, certainly knew a lot about communicating.

The purpose of this website is to be a place where christian and non-christian ideas can meet with respect for Jesus and The Word, whatever it is.

Geoff Fox 18th April 2020

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus you own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus you own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus you own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.